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Chan School grad believes biostatistics can penetrate cancer’s puzzles

Chan School grad believes biostatistics can penetrate cancer’s puzzles

May 24, 2017

This is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.

Daniel Schlauch doesn’t so much love data as love making it work for him.

He downloads the numbers that describe his life, from his Fitbit, his Uber app, and wherever else they accumulate in his data-centric world.

“I keep track of all of those kinds of things in my life,” Schlauch said. “I’m not quite sure

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Harvard scientists help develop algorithm that predicts social cooperation

Harvard scientists help develop algorithm that predicts social cooperation

March 29, 2017

Large social networks foster connections by erasing national, geographic, and even linguistic barriers. But when it comes to fostering cooperation, global connectivity leaves something to be desired, new research says.

Working with colleagues at Emmanuel College, Harvard scientists have developed an algorithm that predicts whether a social structure is likely to favor cooperation, and the findings suggest that strong pairwise relationships — not loose networks scattered across the globe — are the most conducive to cooperation. The study is described in a March

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Harvard launches sweeping data science initiative

Harvard launches sweeping data science initiative

March 28, 2017

 

A statistician and a computer scientist have been named co-leaders of Harvard’s new Data Science Initiative, the Harvard University Office of the Vice Provost for Research announced today.

A University-wide program that will aid cross-disciplinary collaboration, the initiative will be led by Francesca Dominici, professor of biostatistics at the Harvard T.H. Chan

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Expensive care doesn’t buy better health, study finds

Expensive care doesn’t buy better health, study finds

March 13, 2017

Hospitalized patients treated by physicians who order more or more expensive tests and procedures are just as likely to be readmitted or to die as patients treated by doctors who order fewer or less expensive tests, according to research led by Harvard Medical School and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

The study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine on Monday, is believed to be the first to

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When bias hurts profits

When bias hurts profits

February 22, 2017

Researchers have long known that bias can have an impact on hiring, but a new Harvard study suggests that it may also affect workplace performance.

Co-authored by Amanda Pallais, the Paul Sack Associate Professor of Political Economy and Social Studies, the study, which is based on data collected from a French grocery store chain, found that minority workers were far less efficient in a handful of important metrics when working with biased managers.

That drop in performance, Pallais and co-authors Dylan Glover and William Pariente say, can create a self

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Sifting data, seeking justice

Sifting data, seeking justice

January 30, 2017

Growing up in Mexico City as a self-proclaimed geek, Paola Villarreal first realized the power of data after she arrived at a public bike-share station and discovered that all the bikes were taken.

Villarreal, then 26 and a self-taught computer programmer, used information the bike-share program had posted online, albeit in an obscure format, to develop a mobile application. The app allowed her to check her phone for sites on the program’s citywide network that had bikes available. She shared the app with her friends, and before long it became so popular city

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An economy of algorithms

January 27, 2017

For evidence that algorithms have reshaped our most fundamental financial systems, look no further than the quiet floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Once a chaotic scene of shouting traders, the floor is used more today as a backdrop for television interviews than trades.

In the not so distant future, drivers, cashiers, even journalists may go the way of the floor trader, replaced by intelligent algorithms that can do the same job

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How power of positive thinking works

How power of positive thinking works

December 7, 2016

Having an optimistic outlook on life — a general expectation that good things will happen — may help people live longer, according to a new study from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

The study found that women who were optimistic had a significantly reduced risk of dying from several major causes of death — including cancer, heart disease, stroke, respiratory disease, and infection — over an eight-year period, compared with women who were

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